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time and education on what happens in the particular program of which we speak. i'll pledge to each of you today and give you my word that this fall when we do the intel authorization bill we will work to find additional privacy protections with this program that has no emails, no phone calls, no names, and no
to work the increase in costs for special education and special ed transportation. what the spending plan is for the new common core state standards and revenue stream that was in the state budget, issues about the rainy day reserve and how the eligibilities are calculated in our continuing eligibility for the rainy day, money from the city. and issues about the funding priorities or the policy priorities in the district and where can find the spending for those things and the questions that are more structural about how the budget is presented or about descriptions, the narrative descriptions of the variances from year to year so that the people can understand them. >> these are questions about the priorities identified by the board and where is there revenue for the common planning time which the board discussed. what about the ethic studies and the cost that have and where is that budgeted? the kc or the high school exam and these are questions in this one and some others too related to the change in the ways, or the state revenue is budgeted and it does not come so much in the categor
of educational out comes and with this that i say thank you for your service this year to all of our parents, all of our students, and all of our staff members and most senator to our community that has time and time again, supported the education of all of our students in san francisco. let's end this school year with a great board meeting thank you for being here this evening. >> thank you, superintendent. item c, recognition and resolutions of commendation commissioner murase. >> i want to confirm that my speakers are here, they are not here yet? are they coming, do you know? okay. they have just arrived. all right. thank you very much. >> would you like me to read the resolution? >> yes. >> in support of the congressional gold medal tour and the curriculum about the american experiences during world war ii, february 23, 2010, the board of education voted to support a ground breaking five year pilot program at a time that other states like arizona were banning it from public school instruction and the san francisco school district studies collective led by dr. cabalis of the college of ethics
san francisco's ambitious new education start-up, the minerva project. >>> governor jerry brown finally made the move. he delivered on a long time promise to overhaul california's schools. and he's doing it with cash. tonight we get answers for who's going to keep an eye on the books. >> one of the questions they should ask is how are you going to spend that money? >>> and it's summer. with schoolwork out of the way, kids are tapping into the world of social media. but a stanford professor reveals the dangers when teens go online from loneliness to sadness and sends a strong message to parents. here's jessica aguirre. >> welcome to this "class action" education special. we begin tonight with a landmark change for public schools and a big political win for jerry brown. so big that some say this will define his legacy in california. for the first time in 40 years money will be distributed to schools in an entirely new way. early this week the governor signed new school funding legislation known as local control funding formula. and for the first time directs more money to high nee
saves lives, it allows women and girls to make positive productive changes and choices to seek education, to stay in school to participate fully in society. >> to the contrary executive producer cari stein joined these global health leaders in kuala lumpur. she also visited a program where teenagers learn about reproductive health and a women's reproductive health clinic. >> malaysia is a diverse multi-ethnic and multi cultural country in southeast asia where malays, indians, chinese and other ethnic groups live side by side. the national religion is islam, however, the people enjoy religious freedom. kuala lumpur, malaysia. a vibrant modern city in known internationally for the iconic petronas towers. >> in the shadow of downtown kuala lumpur is pudu a small poor marginalized community where a family and reproductive health services clinic struggles to meet the unmet needs of women. >> four boy, one girl. >> 44 year old tangchoi ying comes to this clinic for all her health needs. it's where she gets her yearly physical, blood pressure taken and blood work. it's also where she receiv
-- dedicated by california state laws and less on the quality of education being provided? these are important questions that we believe the state audit will answer and i'm honored to be joined by [speaker not understood] in this effort to examine whether our community colleges and students are being treated fairly, consistently and without bias. we ask for your support to ensure our safe public community colleges are not being forced to waste [speaker not understood] through the fees and taxpayer dollars. [inaudible]. >> thank you. >> thank you. (applause) >>> hello, my name is marco low be and i'm a current ccsf student and i'm going to be a future college student there. ~ lopez if the community did not have the opportunity to attend city college and all of its programs, we would not have the means to change our choices in life. this freedom of choice to attend ccsf and the process of education is a tool to help many inspire and focus towards goals. excuse me. many of which seek focus from and is a means to inspire youth and adults of all cultural, religious, sexual backgrounds, and various
david j johnson of the white house initiative on education excellence for african-americans area for the public service they are offering today in this inaugural event of a congressional caucus on black men and boys. establishing congressional caucus on black men and boys earlier this year, representative danny davis and i out to raise to the national level beginning with the congress serious issues that we and other members of congress are grappling with in our districts along with state and local officials and especially parents and relatives in our african-american communities. the issues are spread across the spectrum of the life of black males in america today. stereotype from their youth andoys, you, -- finally as men. we see a society that does not i'm like men and boys but allow african-american males the opportunity to define themselves as individuals. entitled "the status of black males: ensuring "ur boys mature into strong men cannot drill down to the entire multitude of issues that require attention, remedies, and candid discussion with in the african- american commun
education in the last few years. and also in the context of the fact that the accjc and its leader, barbara beano, were politically fighting in support of the student success task force which, if you analyze the recommendations of that task force that led to the student success act, it narrows the mission. it reduces accessibility of students around the state. and if city college administration and board of trustees fought against those -- the student success task force. so, there was a conflict of interest in bringing ~ the accjc into judge the college. accjc is not an impartial [inaudible]. (applause) >> that's it, thank you. >> next speaker, please. more card. christie luma. roger stott. marlena martinez. and bridget skeela. >>> hi, my name is sharon sutterly. i speak today as a key organizer in the [speaker not understood] organization i'm also at mission campus. also i'm a former student and student rehabilitating from trauma and addiction and education with learning disability. i intend to teach high school to a classroom of revolutionary students. and i know as a living fact that it
that amount. >> class action goes inside the education startup, the minerva project. jerry brown delivered on a long time promise to overhaul california schools and doing it with cash. tonight we get answers for critics who want to know who's going to keep an eye on the books. >> one of the questions they should be asking every one of the districts, how are you going to spend that money? >> with school work out of the way, bay area kids are tapping into the world of social media. a stanford professor reveals the dangers when teens go online and sends a strong message to parents. here's nbc bay area's jessica agurry. >> we have a landmark change for public school and big win for jerry brown, so big some say this will define his legacy in california. for first time in nearly 40 years, money will be distributed to schools in an entirely new way. the governor signed new school funding legislation. it eliminates mandates or what's known as cat gorical spending and directs more money to high needs children and gives local school districts more control over how they spend that money. it's a big c
on the part of the friends of city college now is political pressure, first on the department of education to have you accjc rescind its actions against city college ~ and political pressure on sacramento and our state legislators to restore the master plan for higher education [speaker not understood]. thank you. (applause) >>> hello, everyone. my name is [speaker not understood]. i'm part of students making change. i'm also part of the student involvement [speaker not understood] undocumented student club on campus. and i just want to talk about the reality that a lot of people have been avoiding about city college of san francisco. as a student i've been part of this city college for two years. i just recently finished all my studies last semester. but, you know, like a lot of things are happening here, you know, there are a lot of problems in city college like we have bathrooms that haven't been fixed. we have -- [speaker not understood]. we also have a lot of resistance in terms like a couple years ago we had our resource center being requested by undocumented students and, you know,
that we have a lot of educating to do. in my office we do a lot of cyber bullying training in our schools and it's amazing how much access some kids have to the internet at a really young age. they have iphones. they're on the internet. they have or smartphones. they have computers in the bedroom and parent it is never over the shoulder to see what is going online. there is a lot of unrestricted access to the internet and the internet has put it on another level and one push of a button and everybody in the school will have a picture or hear it and the outcome of that is -- it would be not just reconciling relationships or restorative justice or some other way between two or three or four people but now you have a whole study body that has been tempered or tainted with something that goes against the individual who was a target of that, so the internet working more strongly with the partners and the providers of the internet and there is awareness and education, but back to the student assemblies that we do it is amazing at the end of the assemblies how many kids will step forward qu
to order, the annual budget plan for special education, may i hear a motion and a second? >> moved. >> second. >> thank you. >> and may i have a reading of the recommendation by the superintendent or designee. >> i am going to ask dr. blanco to come forward and read. >> you can just read us the requested action which i believe is quite brief. >> the requested action of the board of education of the san francisco unified school district convene a public hearing and adopt the annual budget and annual service plan for special education. >> nicely done. >> okay. i have several speakers signed up for this item. robin hansen has left. mega and katie franklin, two minutes, each. please. >> hi, megan calusa, i am a special education teacher and i want to comment on the fact that our local area plan has not been updated for a while and it was mentioned that as special education starts to look a little different in this district, we need to start planning for what that looks like as a whole district. as it becomes a bigger part of our district in that thoughtfulness that goes into the planni
is a report. >> the united nations mulala -- an outspoken advocate of women's education. it was the first high-level public appearance of the teenager, who became one of the best known in the world after she was shot on her way to school in 2012 by extremists. after the rally was overrun by militant islamists, more llama began writing a blog m -- mu lala began writing a blog in which he chronicles life under telephone rule. writing under a false name she described how in order to look like students she and schoolmates would go to school in plainclothes with their shawls hidden. she was asked if she would like to be on the slide show that evening. -- on this live show that evening. >> when she was talking to me, the armed militants were standing behind her. she was telling me her school was closed and she wanted to go back to her school, she wanted to get an education, and she was talking very gravely. i was concerned about her security. i asked her, i whispered in her ear, "you may face some problems because the taliban military is standing there. if you want to save your skin, you can go."
is directed in a timely fashion to support high-quality and accessible public education. and i thank you all for initiating this public hearing and what i expect will be ongoing public discussions about our shared and critical resource which is city college of san francisco. thank you. (applause) >> thank you. >>> hi, thank you again for having this meeting. my name is donna hayes. i've been a counselor at city college of san francisco for over 23 years. i want to say that we serve so many different populations and it's not just san francisco. it is a the bay area, naturally the whole country. ~ it's i have students from city college of san francisco not only for our wonderful technical programs, but also labor studies, for lgbtq programs, for any of the ethnic studies programs that we provide that many community colleges and even four-year institutions do not. so, we are serving under served populations that are ignored, thor denied access, and it is important that we maintain our -- excuse me, our community and that community word was taken out of our mission statement in deference to the
.i.t. professor who believes the future of education is on the internet. i can't wait for buzz feed's ten biggest literature fails. please welcome anant agarwal. [ cheers and applause ] how are you? good to see you. hey, how are you? a professor. thank so much for coming on. >> my pleasure stephen: our a professor of electrical engineering and computer science at m.i.t. and you're the president of ed-x. explain to the good people what you're trying to do with the ed-x. >> it is an on-line learning destination where you can come in, sign up very quickly and take fun, hip courses from some of the best universities in the world >> stephen: the university of feep ickes has that. you can do that. i'm serious. they advertise on my show. right? the same thing. >> you can take these great courses from university of like m.i.t., harvard >> stephen: i've heard of them. what does it cost me again? >> it's free. [ cheers and applause ] >> stephen: i don't understand. you're in the knowledge business. i mean a university. let's say i had a shoe store and then i hired you to work at my shoe store. you said, i'
, the purpose of this hearing is really probably for me is to educate myself, other elected officials on how important city college is, to hear -- have a place where people can voice concerns about what's happening with city college as well as to hear what public officials are doing to protect city college. we have representatives from our state level of government and local level of government. i know that our assembly has taken steps and actions to support city college as well as the mayor's office has done so -- is doing so as well, as well involved with the trustee to make sure that city college is able to stay together and keep accreditation. just a couple weeks ago, while it wasn't a big splash, we did ask the question of the mayor at question time separate from our typical way, we ask questions of the mayor. it was more on the spot question to ask what the mayor is doing to support city college at our community -- who are reliant on city college. he poke at that. if we can get an update from the mayor's office as well what the mayor's office is doing. ~ spoke at that there have been q
voices and super expectives through the board of education. we celebrated that mild stone by honoring and acknowledging the people who are essential to establishing the pac and those who help to make the work of the pac possible today. >> the work is closely aligned with the goals of the district balance score card and it is informed by what we learn through our out reach to hear from families across the district. to conversations at schools and a community briefings, as well as joint projects with district staff and community partners. this school year we reached our goal to engage 250 parents educators and students and community members in discussions about education policy issues. >> we engage nearly 130 parents in community advocates through a community conversation in our work around restorative practices. we continued to receive requests from school sites and community organizations around restorative practices. and next year we hope to continue that by extending into mono linguil conversations and specifically around ours. and we also reached out and convened with over 65 parti
to city college and i don't want to lose city college. i know i want to have education for my kids [speaker not understood]. all the students so i will support city college. please keep open. thank you. (applause) >> i'm going to call a few more cards. alvin jah. renato [speaker not understood]. gordon mcclellan. patrick [speaker not understood]. [speaker not understood]. and kabin baras. okay. >>> hello, thank you very much for having this meeting. we really need it. my name is holman turner, i'm a professional photographer. i also teach at city college. i've done that for the past 17 years. so, ~ somehow i fell in love with students and they fell in love with me. and for months i've been walking around as if this was something surreal, that we could actually be thinking about shutting down city college. for months i kept asking myself if the accreditation firm that is seeking to close city college is so interested in the quality of their education, how could they possibly even consider putting 85,000 of them out on the street? the answer, of course, is contained in the question.
you know, a lot of folks go into our early childhood education classes. they come out, you know, we have a deficit of actual child care slots and you can't go to work if you don't have affordable child care. we help in terms of comping out more a supply of child care workers so they can lower the cost of child care. i have a 2-1/2 year old. it's another rent to pay for child care these days. but we try to resolve that. we actually try to resolve that by having more child care slots available. so, i think if you just look at it, yes, everybody knows city college is, you know, important, but these are the things that let us secure -- we wanted to prioritize classes. and maybe we could have made some better decisions. i think so, yes, but really our decisions were made so we can provide access to everybody. and then my last point before i leave is i know that there was a comment about the real estate department. i do really appreciate the mayor's office being involved with this process, but i do think that one service we might not need in terms of prioritization of resources is our rea
on taiwan. i am your host. from trading to investigation -- to education, man has enjoyed a close relationship with taiwan. today we are delighted and honored to have the director of the commercial office of the sultan of oman in taiwan. he will review with us the state of relations up until now. welcome. >> thank you. >> like i said there are many people in taiwan and have had a long-standing relationship with the sultan. a lot of us, i self included, do not know much about your beautiful country. can we start off today's program by asking you -- give us a comprehensive overview of your country, including the size of the population, the land, and the climate. >> thank you very much for this opportunity. the sultanate of oman is one of the most beautiful countries and strategically located countries. we are located at the far southeast corner of the arab peninsula. as you know, we are in the indian ocean and the arabian gulf. we are strategically located. the go to the arabian gulf, most of the arabian oil passes through. >> very important. >> we are the only open country to be on
that information to inform us on the reauthorization of the higher education act. i'll have more to say about that in a second. to get a loan system that does not generate money for the government. so far this debate on student loan interest rates will continue, and i hope that my colleagues will join us in that discussion as we move to the higher education act reauthorization next year. as i said, i'll have a lot more to say about that in a second. now, i have cosponsored this bill that's before us. i will vote for its passage. i will oppose other amendments because we have an agreement to move ahead. and i believe this was the best deal that we could get for students at this time. the bill before us is supported by a number of groups, including the united states student association, the american council on education, rock the vote, center for american progress and generation -- progress, generational alliance, the united states association of student financial aid administrators, and the committee for a responsible federal budget. i might also add to that this evening we received -- this mo
of education for the state of california, that doesn't have necessarily a role that is played in terms of how standards are set -- [multiple voices] >> there needs to be alignment, of course, with whatever the federal regulations are, state regulations. >> so, is that for the acc/jc role of accountability with -- directly with state or federal level? >> they are reviewed by the u.s. department of education and there's another body called the council higher education -- council of higher education of accreditation. it's called chia. >> thank you. >> and i can send more formal information on that as well. the commissioners of the accrediting commission are faculty members from other institutions. there are 19 commissioners. there are some that represents -- there are three members that represent public interests. there are administrators, some other member institutions, and then people representing other educational entities. they go through a nomination process and it's the chief executive officer, the chancellors and presidents who elect the commissioners. and, again, it's a peer review proce
is this doesn't feel like a game to me. (applause) >> this is about the lives and their educations and this is about san francisco and who we are. and the harm is real and immediate and doesn't wait till the end of the game. so, i want to thank you all again for stepping up. i think when we are dealing with a body that is unelected, unaccountable, nontransparent, it is very hard for elected officials to figure out how they -- what even their role is in trying to address this problem, that there is a real harm, it's real for san francisco. and i'm glad that you are doing everything that you can to try and address it, so, thank you. (applause) >> so, we can start public comment, and i have a number of cards to bring up. first, i want to put a card up forward that's alyssa messer with aft 21, 21 and might need a little extra time to present that. we need help getting that set up as well. and then what is the length of time for -- two minutes per person. okay. tell us when you're ready. >> so, sfgov-tv, can we have the -- thank you. >>> [speaker not understood] aft 21 21, we represent
'd love to know ♪ >> production funding and educational outreach for biz kids is provided by a coalition of america's credit unions, where people are worth more than money. a complete list of individual credit union funders is available at wxxi.org. >> every day, america's credit unions help members with their financial needs and with programs like invest in america. it's only fitting that credit unions support biz kids because financial education is what we do. learn more at lovemycreditunion.org. >> joe, i want to tell you one of the secrets to success. >> secrets to success, sir? >> it's all about education. >> i don't care about that. >> well, you should, joe, because education increases your earning potential. >> well, what do you mean exactly? >> i mean each year of education can add $50,000 to your average annual income.
college education and where i began to get a real education because i left this country. i had to go over to england in order to have my experience here with racism and my experience as a black man be with corroborated. so i learned how to develop a critical analysis of this country by being over in england. i had mentors, multiple mentors. i mean, i had mentors in the streets, and i had mentors also in the classroom, a wide range of mentors. this notion that you have only one mentor, that's crazy. i had multiple mentors. i had drug dealers who were mentors, i had professors who were mentors, a wide range of mentors. and i took from each what i needed. in fact, one of those mentors told me that i had what it takes to get a ph.d. and so that's how i ended up going to graduate school. [applause] granted, i didn't go to graduate school in harlem, i went to graduate school in wyoming. [laughter] and that's a story. [laughter] that's another story. i talk about that story. >> you said that you had an abundance of adolescent cockiness that created risk blindness. i think a lot of participants c
enrollment and [speaker not understood]. without the college i wouldn't be able to pursue my educational goal. i'm a former foster youth. i grew upright here in san francisco, was very active in my community and came back to city college to now pursue my degree and my future and, you know, i don't know any other guidance program like the one at city college in the state. it would be devastating for me to lose the opportunity that that program provides. i mean, it provides a safety net for me as a student, to be able to get my books, to get housing assistance, to get transportation assistance, and that's just one of the programs that ccsf has to offer. i mean, this school is a gem. i mean, we are the model school for the nation. thank you. (applause) >> thank you. >>> good afternoon, supervisors. my name is [speaker not understood] simmons and i am the [speaker not understood] president of downtown campus. i am here on behalf of almost 10,000 students and also on behalf of the 85,000 students. i would like to speak about our students who are immigrants who need city college so much. as a nativ
it should be there for esl students, it should be there for everybody because education really does contribute to -- i think 60% of our culinary students end up within the first three months, they end up getting a job somewhere in san francisco hospitalities industry. these are like stories and these are statistics that we can continue to pump out. so, our institution actually does a very great job at educating students. i don't think that is at issue. in terms of governance, we just prioritize different things. when we lost $53 million, the first thing that we did was we looked at our administrators and we split the cost savings there. we looked at consulting fees and looked at cost savings there. that is drastically different than what some other colleges did. first they looked at their faculty to fire. then they looked at their staff to fire. then they looked at classes to cut. we said we don't want to balance the budget on the backs of students and our workers if we don't have to. and that's the drastically different approach to looking at it. once again, that reflects our value
in terms of standards and criteria are supposed to substantiate the quality of education. and what accjc has done is distort the meaning of accreditation to make city college fulfill these criteria that don't really talk about the quality of education. let me move on real fast. secondly, punishment needs to fit the crime. okay. i work for muni. you have unreliable schedules. they haven't been fulfilling for 10 years, for over 10 years. shut it down, okay. [laughter] >>> you know the idea. okay. and just a few comments that i hope you guys can pass on. these were collected for accjc for the third -- could i just read one of them, the best one? >> just one. >>> okay, just one. this is from my next door neighbor. there are world class instructors teaching at city college, graduating high school students deserve their expertise. the problem ccsf faces in regard to the budget need to be addressed -- needs to be addressed in other ways, not by compromising its accreditation. and she was a student at city college and she's a high school teacher. and i got these comments to give to accjc and the
another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is acceptable behavior and what is unacceptable behavior, and i am often fearful when we try to develop a black letter law if you have all these factors and bullying and you fell outside and that works okay in the courtroom. right? as prosecutors we need clear understanding of the laws to understand whether we have a criminal violation or not, but i am fearful we maybe overly legalistic and the way we deal with on a daily basis and we need to approach this by a global perspective respecting people and understanding we have the same rights and obligations and starting with the adults and i go back to the adults because the adults really have to tow the line here. they really have to walk the talk. i cannot tell you how often i of involved in large mentoring efforts and now in two different places, in l.a. and arizona. i cannot tell you how often the teachers are the ones that set the tone whether we have a respectable environment or and not part of that is educatio
drinking water fountains in schools, and do some education and decrease environmental impact of bottled water. what they found through this study was by providing bottles to students, students brought bottles of water to school more. they filled them more. teachers allow students to drink more water. purchased bottled water was lower at those schools -- the intervention. and what they found was regardless of the presence of the filling station, most students drink water at school and that's because there aren't a whole lot of other options. again, it's looking at how we create the environment and set the environment for success. and about a quarter of the students are drinking four more glasses of water at school. that's great. we'd love to see a higher percentage but that's a good start. so, some efforts to increase water consumption. through the health department, supervisor mar noted we've been doing a whole host of work. our otter, i think we're going to call him sutro sam, this is a drink water in the otter booklet geared 4 to eight-year olds. our friends at first 5 developed somet
david j. jones at the white house initiative on educational excellence for african-americans , for the public service they are offering today in this inaugural event of the congressional caucus on black men and boys. in establishing the congressional caucus on black men and boys earlier this year representative davis and i sought to raise to the national level beginning with the congress serious issues that we and other members of congress are grappling with in our districts, along with state and local officials and especially parents and relatives and and/or african-american community itself. the issues are spread across the spectrum of the life of black males in america today, the closed in stereotypes from their years as a ways, as toys as youth and family as men. we seek a society that does not define black men and boys but allows african-american males the opportunity to define themselves as individuals. today's event entitled the status of luck males -- black males cannot drill down to the entire multitude of issues that require remedies and candid discussions
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 997 (some duplicates have been removed)